Welcome!

S.M.A.R.T., Inc. is a non-profit organization 501(c)(3) dedicated to strengthening individuals, families, and communities.

S.M.A.R.T., Inc. has three areas of focus:
                                                                Local Prevention Council (LPC), 
                                                                                 Parent University, and 
                                                                                 Family, School and Community Events.                                                                      
                                                                                    
 
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May is....

Mental Health Awareness Month 
 
 

Mental Health Facts

  • 1 in 5 (46.6 million) adults in the United States experience a mental health condition in a given year.
  • 1 in 25 (11.2 million) adults in the United States experience a serious mental illness in a given year.
  • Approximately 46.6 million adults in the United States face the reality of managing a mental illness every day.
  • Half of all lifetime mental health conditions begin by age 14 and 75% by age 24, but early intervention programs can help.
  • Up to 90% of those who die by suicide have an underlying mental illness as revealed by psychological autopsy. 46% of those who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental illness.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. With effective care, suicidal thoughts are treatable, and suicide is preventable.
  • Individuals with mental health conditions face an average 11-year delay between experiencing symptoms and starting treatment.
  • Common barriers to treatment include the cost of mental health care and insurance, prejudice and discrimination, and structural barriers like transportation.
  • Even though most people can experience relief from symptoms and support for their recovery in treatment, less than half of the adults in the United States get the help they need.

WhyCare?

Care is a simple 4-letter word, but a powerful way to change lives for people affected by mental illness.
It’s an action. It’s a feeling. It’s a gift we give to ourselves and to each other. People feel loved when someone cares. People feel heard when someone cares. People recover when someone cares. Society changes when people care. Entire systems change when people care. For more than 40 years, NAMI has been a beacon of help and hope by providing the support, education and advocacy to ensure that all people affected by mental health conditions get the care they need and deserve. #NAMICares #WhyCare


 

Purpose of National Prevention Week

Monday May 13th-Friday May 17th

 

The three primary goals of National Prevention Week are to:

·       Involve communities in raising awareness of substance use and mental health issues and in implementing prevention strategies, and showcasing effectiveness of evidence-based prevention programs;

·       Foster partnerships and collaborations with federal agencies and national organizations dedicated to improving public health; and

·       Promote and disseminate quality substance use prevention and mental health promotion resources and publications.

Each year, National Prevention Week includes daily themes to focus on major substance use and mental health topics. The 2019 daily themes are:

·       Monday, May 13: Preventing Prescription and Opioid Drug Misuse

Patients can take steps to ensure that they use prescription medications appropriately by:

1.       following the directions as explained on the label or by the pharmacist

2.       being aware of potential interactions with other drugs as well as alcohol

3.       never stopping or changing a dosing regimen without first discussing it with the doctor

4.       never using another person’s prescription and never giving their prescription medications to others

5.       storing prescription stimulants, sedatives, and opioids safely

Additionally, patients should properly discard unused or expired medications by following U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines or visiting U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration collection sites.55 In addition to describing their medical problem, patients should always inform their health care professionals about all the prescriptions, over-the-counter medicines, and dietary and herbal supplements they are taking before they obtain any other medications.

·       Tuesday, May 14: Preventing Underage Drinking and Alcohol Misuse

Use These 5 Goals When Talking to Kids about Alcohol and Other Drugs

1. Show you disapprove of underage drinking and other drug misuse.

Over 80 percent of young people ages 10–18 say their parents are the leading influence on their decision whether to drink. Send a clear and strong message that you disapprove of underage drinking and misuse of other drugs.

2. Show you care about your child’s health, wellness, and success.

Young people are more likely to listen when they know you’re on their side. Reinforce why you don’t want your child to drink or use other drugs—because you want your child to be happy and safe. The conversation will go a lot better if you’re open and you show concern.

3. Show you’re a good source of information about alcohol and other drugs.

You want your child to make informed decisions about alcohol and other drugs with reliable information about their dangers. You don’t want your child to learn about alcohol and other drugs from unreliable sources. Establish yourself as a trustworthy source of information.

4. Show you’re paying attention and you’ll discourage risky behaviors.

Show you’re aware of what your child is up to, as young people are more likely to drink or use other drugs if they think no one will notice. Do this in a subtle way, without prying.

5. Build your child’s skills and strategies for avoiding underage drinking and drug use.

Even if you don’t think your child wants to drink or try other drugs, peer pressure is a powerful thing. Having a plan to avoid alcohol and drug use can help children make better choices. Talk with your child about what they would do if faced with a decision about alcohol and drugs, such as texting a code word to a family member or practicing how they’ll say “no thanks.”

Keep it low-key. Don’t worry, you don’t have to get everything across in one talk. Plan to have many short talks.

·       Wednesday, May 15: Preventing Illicit Drug Use and Youth Marijuana Use

Resources for Parents

Parents or other caregivers looking for resources and strategies to prevent, or stop, illicit drug use by adolescents, can visit the Partnership at DrugFree.org exit disclaimer icon.

Get Smart About Drugs exit disclaimer icon is an online resource from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for parents. It includes research, news, quizzes, and videos to educate parents about how to identify and prevent drug abuse among children and young adults.

“Growing up Drug Free: A Parent’s Guide to Prevention” - PDF is a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Education that provides information and research specifically for parents on why kids use drugs and how parents can be involved in helping them stay drug free.

·       Thursday, May 16: Preventing Youth Tobacco Use

Tell your children that most kids DON’T smoke.

Make your home and your car tobacco-free zones for everyone—family, friends, and visitors—and ban the use of all tobacco products.

Set a good example and don’t use tobacco yourself—it’s the best thing you can do.

Talk with your kids often about what nicotine addiction can cost them as they get older—and tell them you expect them to say no to tobacco.

Make sure your children’s schools enforce tobacco-free policies on campus and at all school-sponsored events.

If your child is using tobacco, get help to quit for him or her right away. Nicotine is a highly addictive drug, and even experimenting with cigarettes one time increases your child’s chance of being hooked for life. You can start by talking with your child’s doctor.

·       Friday, May 17: Preventing Suicide

Trying to tell the difference between what expected behaviors are and what might be the signs of a mental illness isn't always easy. There's no easy test that can let someone know if there is mental illness or if actions and thoughts might be typical behaviors of a person or the result of a physical illness.

Each illness has its own symptoms, but common signs of mental illness in adults and adolescents can include the following:

·       Excessive worrying or fear

·       Feeling excessively sad or low

·       Confused thinking or problems concentrating and learning

·       Extreme mood changes, including uncontrollable “highs” or feelings of euphoria

·       Prolonged or strong feelings of irritability or anger

·       Avoiding friends and social activities

·       Difficulties understanding or relating to other people

·       Changes in sleeping habits or feeling tired and low energy

·       Changes in eating habits such as increased hunger or lack of appetite

·       Changes in sex drive

·       Difficulty perceiving reality (delusions or hallucinations, in which a person experiences and senses things that don't exist in objective reality)

·       Inability to perceive changes in one’s own feelings, behavior or personality (”lack of insight” or anosognosia)

·       Abuse of substances like alcohol or drugs

·       Multiple physical ailments without obvious causes (such as headaches, stomach aches, vague and ongoing “aches and pains”)

·       Thinking about suicide

·       Inability to carry out daily activities or handle daily problems and stress

·       An intense fear of weight gain or concern with appearance

Mental health conditions can also begin to develop in young children. Because they’re still learning how to identify and talk about thoughts and emotions, their most obvious symptoms are behavioral. Symptoms in children may include the following:

·       Changes in school performance

·       Excessive worry or anxiety, for instance fighting to avoid bed or school

·       Hyperactive behavior

·       Frequent nightmares

·       Frequent disobedience or aggression

·       Frequent temper tantrums

Where To Get Help

Don’t be afraid to reach out if you or someone you know needs help. Learning all you can about mental health is an important first step.

Reach out to your health insurance, primary care doctor or state/country mental health authority for more resources.

Contact the NAMI HelpLine to find out what services and supports are available in your community. 

If you or someone you know needs helps now, you should immediately call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or call 911.

 

 

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 Some dates to remember:  
 
The Local Prevention (LPC)
will be meeting the 4th Tuesday of every month at  Southbury Town Hall Room 201 from 6pm to 8pm
ANY community member is welcome and encouraged to join! 
The next meeting of the 2018-2019 season is  Tuesday, May 28th
Hope to see you there!!
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   Upcoming Events Corner   
 
 
 
 
 
 
To Register: Click HERE 
 
 
 
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 3 KEY FACTS ABOUT OPIOIDS
  1. Knowledge is power. The more you know about opioids the better. Because you can do more for anyone who is struggling with them.
  2. People in crisis need supportPeople addicted to opioids have a serious medical condition that requires understanding.
  3. Opioid misuse is a medical condition that requires medical solutions. Talk to your doctor openly and honestly. He or she can help with different approaches to managing pain, treatment options, and medical planning.
Go to www.drugfreect.org for treatment, recovery and prevention resources.  For addiction treatment 24/7 call the Access Line: 1-800-563-4086  
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Yoga of 12-Step Recovery Program Kicks Off in the Tri-bury Area!!!

“The Issues Live in Our Tissues”

Starting Sunday, February 18, 2018, 5:00PM-6:30PM (and every 1st & 3rd Sunday)

At The Ruby Tree Yoga Studio

670 Main Street South (Sherman Village)

Woodbury CT

WHAT is Y12SR? Yoga of 12 Step Recovery combines the physical and spiritual practice of yoga with the practical tools laid out in twelve step programs of recovery, providing another tool in the toolbox of sustainable recovery and relapse prevention.

WHY combine yoga and recovery? The 12-Step Recovery model takes a cognitive approach to recovery. The practice of yoga (which means union, balance) is a somatic approach. Y12SR pairs both, taking a holistic approach and says, “The issues live in our tissues” – that the body bears the burden of addiction, the effects get “stuck” in us, and the practice of yoga can release what is held in our bodies.

WHO can attend Y12SR Meetings? Y12SR is open to anyone and everyone who is dealing with addiction, their own addictive behavior or who is affected by the addictive behavior of others. All “A’s” are welcome. Beginners are welcome! The practice that is offered is accessible to all bodies and levels of yoga experience. The principles of safety and anonymity are upheld by Y12SR.

WHAT are Y12SR Meetings like? Meetings are modeled after the format of 12 step programs, the meeting starts out with a topic or reading with discussion in a group sharing circle, followed by an intentional themed yoga class. About half of the time will be devoted to a gentle, restorative yoga practice.

HOW much does a Y12SR class cost? Y12SR is donation based, there is a suggested donation of whatever amount a drop in yoga class in the area would cost (between $15-20). No one is ever turned away. You are more important than your money. Donations collected are split 3 ways; with a 1/3 going to the facility where the class is held, 1/3 going to the instructor, and 1/3 going to a non-profit organization that is working in the area of recovery and addiction services. S.M.A.R.T., Inc. has been chosen to be the first recipient of the proceeds from this Tri-bury Y12SR meeting.

WHEN and WHERE are Meetings Held? Y12SR Meetings are held the first and third Sunday of the month, from 5PM to 6:30PM at the Ruby Tree Yoga Studio, 670 Main Street South (Sherman Village), Woodbury, CT.

WHO can I contact for more information?

Lisa Martland (lisa.martland@gmail.com) or Christine Granja (christinegranja@att.net). For more information about what Y12SR is visit www.y12sr.com.


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SMART Recovery meetings at UCC Southbury

SMART Recovery, a 25 year old recovery program is coming to the United Church of Christ at 283 Main Street North in Southbury. The free peer support meetings will be held in the Parlor on Friday evenings at 7 PM, starting on December 15, 2017. The program uses a modern, science-based, abstinence-oriented approach to the four areas people struggle with when recovering from addictions:

·        Living a balanced life

·        Building and maintaining motivation

·        Coping with urges

·       Dealing with self-defeating thoughts, feelings and behaviors

Meetings are confidential. You are not required to participate and can just watch, or jump right in and join the conversation.

A typical meeting consists of an introduction, check-in, working time where we use SMART Recovery tools to solve problems, a check-out, and a few minutes for socializing.

You're welcome at the meeting regardless of which substance or behavior you are addicted to. There's no need to call ahead, just turn up.

For more information, call the meeting facilitators at 475-209-8100, email info@smartrecoveryct.org, or visit https://smartrecovery.org/

For additional information click here for flyer.

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Southbury-Oxford C.A.R.E.S. Family Hope & Support Group Begins

C.A.R.E.S. provides free, weekly drop-in support groups for parents, families, and concerned individuals impacted by substance use disorder.

By Donna DeLuca, Patch Poster |
 
Click Here to read the full article!
 
 
 

To register, visit www.mhconn.org/education/mental-health-first-aid.


  
 

Upcoming Opportunities:

Teens, are you struggling with Depression and marijuana/alcohol use? 
 
Click below to learn of an opportunity to participate in an ATOM program T-TAAD study at UCONN Health, which may help!
 

 
 
Do you know what to do if you suspect your child is using alcohol, tobacco or other drugs?
Do you know how to have a meaningful conversation with your child about substance use?
Talk to Your Kids

 
 
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Call us:
1-203-788-5199
Find us:
Southbury and Middlebury, CT
© 2012 by S.M.A.R.T., Inc.