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S.M.A.R.T., Inc. is a non-profit organization 501(c)(3) dedicated to strengthening individuals, families, and communities.

S.M.A.R.T., Inc. has three areas of focus:
                                                                Local Prevention Council (LPC), 
                                                                                 Parent University, and 
                                                                                 Family, School and Community Events.                                                                      
                                                                                    


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April is....

 From https://www.ncadd.org

Our Theme: 

“Changing Attitudes:  It’s not a ‘rite of passage.’ ”

Alcohol and drug use by young people is extremely dangerous--both to themselves and to society--and is directly associated with traffic fatalities, violence, suicide, educational failure, alcohol overdose, unsafe sex and other problem behaviors, even for those who may never develop a dependence or addiction. Adolescence is a time of heightened risk-taking and as alcohol and drugs enter the picture, parents are faced with a unique set of challenges.  Parents often forgive underage drinking as a “rite of passage.”  They can simply sit back and hope their kids will “get through it,” or they can change their attitude and take an active role in learning about alcohol and drugs and help their kids do the same. 

It can be daunting to talk with children about drinking and drug use, but it is well worth the effort parents put into it. In fact, research has shown that kids who have conversations with their parents and learn a lot about the dangers of alcohol and drug use are 50 percent less likely to use these substances than those who don’t have such conversations.  Here’s the opportunity when parents can reinforce that using alcohol is not a ‘rite of passage.’  In fostering “changing attitudes” parents can help kids understand that drinking isn’t a way to feel or be independent, “cool,” or to fit in socially.  Young people can learn that alcohol is not necessary for having a good time and non-use of alcohol is a healthy and viable option.  We can learn to respect another person’s decision not to drink alcohol. 

“Alcohol and drug use is a very risky business for young people,” says Andrew Pucher, President and CEO of NCADD, “and parents can make a difference. The longer children delay drinking and drug use, the less likely they are to develop any problems associated with it. That’s why it is so important to help your child make smart decisions about alcohol and drugs.” 

An integral part of Alcohol Awareness Month is Alcohol-Free Weekend (March 30-April 1, 2018), which is designed to raise public awareness about the use of alcohol and how it may be affecting individuals, families, and the community. During this seventy-two-hour period, NCADD extends an open invitation to all Americans, young and old, to participate in three alcohol-free days and to use this time to contact local NCADD Affiliates and other alcoholism agencies to learn more about alcoholism and its early symptoms. 

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 Some dates to remember:  
 
The Local Prevention (LPC)
will be meeting the 4th Thursday of every month at  Southbury Town Hall Room 201 from 6pm to 8pm
ANY community member is welcome and encouraged to join! 
The next meeting of the 2017-2018 season is  Thursday, April 26th
Hope to see you there!!
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   Upcoming Events Corner   
 
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Click HERE for more information and to register for free! 
 

Many influencers have been calling on technology companies to redesign their products to make them easier for parents to parent around. Industry insiders are finally publicly requesting that tech companies make changes to the addictive nature of their products. Another positive trend is that many celebrities are promoting breaks from social media.

Parents, teachers, and principals all over the world who I talk to are desperately seeking solutions to the hourly battles with their youth about screen time. Let’s share with these young people how the folks who create technology, and the celebrities who thrive off it, are rethinking its effects. Here are some examples:

Salesforce (company that creates software to manage sales) CEO Marc Benioff said on CNBC’s Squawk Alley, "I think that you do it exactly the same way that you regulated the cigarette industry. Here's a product: Cigarettes. They're addictive, they're not good for you. I think that for sure, technology has addictive qualities that we have to address, and that product designers are working to make those products more addictive and we need to rein that back."

In 2015, singer Ed Sheeran publicly said, "I’m going to travel the world and see everything I missed" after spending the last five years taking life in "through a screen." In 2017, he re-emerged and told E! News, "I feel like life is all about balance, and my life wasn't balanced. Taking it all off the scale balanced it, oddly enough."

In 2016, Selena Gomez took a 3-month phone break. "I recently took 90 days off. During that time I did not have my cell phone," she told Thrive Global. "It was the most refreshing, calming, rejuvenating feeling. Now I rarely pick up my phone, and only limited people have access to me."

That same year, Julia Roberts revealed to InStyle, “Everyone has Instagram on their phone. And I just, yeah, [if I had it] I would be looking at it all the time.”

In 2017, Emily Watson spoke to CNN,  “Social media takes so much of our attention. It’s so important to keep an eye on what your daily diet is. In the same way, we think about what we eat, we should think about what we read, what we’re seeing, what we’re engaging and what we’re interacting with every day.”

Barry Rosenstein, the managing partner of JANA, one of the biggest investors in Apple, signed an open letter to Apple asking them to add features that would make their phones less addictive, especially for children. As reported by CNBC, Rosenstein wants Apple "to build software that would give parents more options to limit children's phone use, pointing out that the iPhone maker's reputation and stock could be hurt if this issue remains unchecked.”

This week Apple released a landing page on their website that gives tips to parents on managing their children’s screen use, purchasing habits, and tracking. Apple has not created, nor publicly disclosed, that they will make software that will help parents gain control of time spent.

Tristan Harris, a former employee at Google, and Aza Raskin, who headed user experience at Mozilla, just founded the Center for Humane Technology. The center’s mission is to pressure companies like Apple and Microsoft to “redesign their devices and core interfaces to protect our minds from constant distractions, minimize screen time, protect our time in relationships, and replace the App Store marketplace of apps competing for usage with a marketplace of tools competing to benefit our lives and society.”

For this week's Tech Talk Tuesday, let’s discuss tech’s responsibility in preventing excessive screen time and the celebrity voices in this dialogue. Here are some conversation starters:

· What is something interesting you have heard about companies or celebrities regarding healthy screen use?

· Can you think of a celebrity that you admire that does not use social media much?

· What do you think of Benioff's idea of regulating social media like cigarettes?

· Do you think it is the company’s responsibility to design technology to be less addictive, or do you think it should only be up to the user?

For more discussion ideas, you can peruse past Tech Talk Tuesdays 
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 3 KEY FACTS ABOUT OPIOIDS
  1. Knowledge is power. The more you know about opioids the better. Because you can do more for anyone who is struggling with them.
  2. People in crisis need supportPeople addicted to opioids have a serious medical condition that requires understanding.
  3. Opioid misuse is a medical condition that requires medical solutions. Talk to your doctor openly and honestly. He or she can help with different approaches to managing pain, treatment options, and medical planning.
Go to www.drugfreect.org for treatment, recovery and prevention resources.  For addiction treatment 24/7 call the Access Line: 1-800-563-4086  
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Yoga of 12-Step Recovery Program Kicks Off in the Tri-bury Area!!!

“The Issues Live in Our Tissues”

Starting Sunday, February 18, 2018, 5:00PM-6:30PM (and every 1st & 3rd Sunday)

At The Ruby Tree Yoga Studio

670 Main Street South (Sherman Village)

Woodbury CT

WHAT is Y12SR? Yoga of 12 Step Recovery combines the physical and spiritual practice of yoga with the practical tools laid out in twelve step programs of recovery, providing another tool in the toolbox of sustainable recovery and relapse prevention.

WHY combine yoga and recovery? The 12-Step Recovery model takes a cognitive approach to recovery. The practice of yoga (which means union, balance) is a somatic approach. Y12SR pairs both, taking a holistic approach and says, “The issues live in our tissues” – that the body bears the burden of addiction, the effects get “stuck” in us, and the practice of yoga can release what is held in our bodies.

WHO can attend Y12SR Meetings? Y12SR is open to anyone and everyone who is dealing with addiction, their own addictive behavior or who is affected by the addictive behavior of others. All “A’s” are welcome. Beginners are welcome! The practice that is offered is accessible to all bodies and levels of yoga experience. The principles of safety and anonymity are upheld by Y12SR.

WHAT are Y12SR Meetings like? Meetings are modeled after the format of 12 step programs, the meeting starts out with a topic or reading with discussion in a group sharing circle, followed by an intentional themed yoga class. About half of the time will be devoted to a gentle, restorative yoga practice.

HOW much does a Y12SR class cost? Y12SR is donation based, there is a suggested donation of whatever amount a drop in yoga class in the area would cost (between $15-20). No one is ever turned away. You are more important than your money. Donations collected are split 3 ways; with a 1/3 going to the facility where the class is held, 1/3 going to the instructor, and 1/3 going to a non-profit organization that is working in the area of recovery and addiction services. S.M.A.R.T., Inc. has been chosen to be the first recipient of the proceeds from this Tri-bury Y12SR meeting.

WHEN and WHERE are Meetings Held? Y12SR Meetings are held the first and third Sunday of the month, from 5PM to 6:30PM at the Ruby Tree Yoga Studio, 670 Main Street South (Sherman Village), Woodbury, CT.

WHO can I contact for more information?

Lisa Martland (lisa.martland@gmail.com) or Christine Granja (christinegranja@att.net). For more information about what Y12SR is visit www.y12sr.com.


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SMART Recovery meetings at UCC Southbury

SMART Recovery, a 25 year old recovery program is coming to the United Church of Christ at 283 Main Street North in Southbury. The free peer support meetings will be held in the Parlor on Friday evenings at 7 PM, starting on December 15, 2017. The program uses a modern, science-based, abstinence-oriented approach to the four areas people struggle with when recovering from addictions:

·        Living a balanced life

·        Building and maintaining motivation

·        Coping with urges

·       Dealing with self-defeating thoughts, feelings and behaviors

Meetings are confidential. You are not required to participate and can just watch, or jump right in and join the conversation.

A typical meeting consists of an introduction, check-in, working time where we use SMART Recovery tools to solve problems, a check-out, and a few minutes for socializing.

You're welcome at the meeting regardless of which substance or behavior you are addicted to. There's no need to call ahead, just turn up.

For more information, call the meeting facilitators at 475-209-8100, email info@smartrecoveryct.org, or visit https://smartrecovery.org/

For additional information click here for flyer.

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Southbury-Oxford C.A.R.E.S. Family Hope & Support Group Begins

C.A.R.E.S. provides free, weekly drop-in support groups for parents, families, and concerned individuals impacted by substance use disorder.

By Donna DeLuca, Patch Poster |
 
Click Here to read the full article!
 
 
 

To register, visit www.mhconn.org/education/mental-health-first-aid.


  
 

Upcoming Opportunities:

Teens, are you struggling with Depression and marijuana/alcohol use? 
 
Click below to learn of an opportunity to participate in an ATOM program T-TAAD study at UCONN Health, which may help!
 

 
 
Do you know what to do if you suspect your child is using alcohol, tobacco or other drugs?
Do you know how to have a meaningful conversation with your child about substance use?
Talk to Your Kids

 
 
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Call us:
1-203-788-5199
Find us:
Southbury and Middlebury, CT
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